Bio 181, Fall 2002, Dr. Lisa Werner

 

Learning Objectives for Chapter 13, Patterns of Inheritance

 

Understand and be able to use the following terms:

alleles

autosome

continuous variation

codominance

cross

cross fertilization

cystic fibrosis

dihybrid

dominant

Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy

eggs

epistasis

F1 generation

F2 generation

fertilization

gametes

genes

genetic recombination

genotype

hemophilia

heterozygous

homozygous

Huntington’s Disease

incomplete dominance

linkage

locus

law of independent assortment

law of segregation

monohybrid

multiple alleles

parental generation

pedigree

phenotype

polygenic inheritance

pleiotripic

Punnett square

recessive

self fertilize

sex chromosome

sex-linked gene

self fertilization

sickle cell anemia

sperm

Tay-Sachs disease

wild type

 

 

 

 

1.       What is a wild type trait?

2.       Why were garden peas a good experimental organism for Mendel's study of genetics?

3.       How did Mendel control fertilization of the pea plants? Why was this important for conducting genetic experiments?

4.       Distinguish between the parental, F1 and F2 generations.

5.       Distinguish between: gene/allele/loci; dominant /recessive; homozygous/heterozygous; genotype/phenotype.

6.       Distinguish between the law of Segregation and the law of Independent Assortment. Be able to explain them using your own words.

7.       Distinguish between a monohybrid cross and a dihybrid cross. Which demonstrates the law of segregation?  Which demonstrates the law of independent assortment?

8.       Be able to predict the genotypes and phenotypes of a monohybrid cross, or a dihybrid cross.   If given the genotypes of offspring, be able to give the genotypes of parents.

9.       Be able to read a family pedigree to figure out probable genotypes of family members (for example, whether a family member is likely to be a carrier). Recognize what the squares, circles, and colored symbols represent.

10.   Be able to give examples of both recessive and dominant genetic disorders seen in humans.

11.   Be able explain the genetic basis for phenotypes seen in traits showing incomplete dominance. Be able to recognize cases of incomplete dominance.

12.   Be able explain the genetic basis for continuous traits such as intelligence and height.

13.   Distinguish between the genetic basis of epistasis and pleiotropy.

14.   How is gender determined in humans?

15.  How is the inheritance of traits from genes on the sex chromosomes is different from that of traits from genes on the autosomes?

16.  Be able to predict the genotypes and phenotypes of sex-linked crosses, or determine the genotypes and phenotypes of parents of children with sex-linked traits.