Physical Setting
Climate
Adaptations
Tucson Plants
Tucson Animals
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Physical Setting
Climate
Adaptations
Tucson Plants
Tucson Animals
External Resources

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TYPES OF INTERRELATIONSHIPS

MUTUALISM: both species benefit from interaction
honey bee on flowerA common example of mutualism is the interrelationship between flower and pollinator coyote scat with seedsAnother common example is payment of fruit for seed dispersal
COMPETITION: both species (or individuals) lose from interaction
bobcat, kangaroo rat, and coyoteWhen a scarce resource (food, shelter, mates, etc.) is shared, often competition is the result
PREDATION: the predator gains by killing and eating the prey (who loses)
gila monster eating mouseHere a gila monster eats a mouse crab spider eating butterflyAnother example is this crab spider eating this butterfly.
PARASITISM: the parasite gains by feeding on the host (loses)
mistletoe on a treeDesert mistletoe takes water and nutrients from this desert ironwood. mantid egg case parasitized by waspThis praying mantis egg case has been parasitized by a wasp whose larvae fed on the mantids and then chewed their way out of the egg case.
COMMENSALISM: the commensal gains while the host is unaffected
ail of gopher snake disappearing into rodent holeA gopher snake uses an abandoned rodent hole.

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